Skip to main content

Earth and Environmental Sciences

EES_Banner_3_2017

Earth and Environmental Sciences students will find excellent opportunities to explore contemporary environmental issues and participate in scientific research with departmental faculty; whether in excellent facilities or in the current Gulf Coast environmental field laboratories.


A Glance at the Program

  • Consists of a multidisciplinary approach that combines natural science and research management
  • Students learn to analyze physical and socio-economic environments and to reach decisions concerning environmental use and management
  • Offers a core curriculum that is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in the earth and environmental sciences, as well as in the modern methods and techniques used by scientists and environmental professionals 
  • Techniques include cartography, remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), spatial statistics, and environmental sampling and surveying 
  • Classes generally host 25-35 students, while labs consist of 15-20 students.

Two gentlemen next to a pool
Professor Mel Droubay (left) with Professor Klaus Meyer (right)

Remembering a Beloved Professor

Professor Droubay started at UWF in 1994 as a part-time adjunct instructor of geography and environmental studies. In the early-to-mid-1990s, Environmental Studies was a popular undergraduate major at UWF. He was the main advisor for the small department, and many say that he held the program together. His position was eventually upgraded to full-time Lecturer. He taught a wide variety of geography and environmental policy courses, and students loved him for the many stories he told and the compassion he held for others. With his connections in the local environmental arena, Professor Droubay secured several research grants. He also led a student group to Cuba in 2003 and was a co-leader on a trip to Honduras in 2001.

Professor Droubay retired from UWF in 2007. Before coming here and after leaving he did so many wonderful things. If you wish to honor his memory, the family has asked that you please consider making a gift in his memory to support scholarships in the Department of Environmental Sciences.

Please keep his family in your thoughts during this time.


Synchronous Online Classes

We started offering synchronous master’s degree classes in the Fall 2019 semester. Synchronous classes allow students to take classes online that are already being taught real-time in a face-to-face format. The synchronous online classes are a professional development opportunity for working professionals. Classes are offered in the late afternoon and early evening so working professionals can attend.

Synchronous Online MS Degree


three students standing next to tent on beach
Co-Authors: Chloe Jackson - left, Miranda Anaya - center, Guy Chapman – right.

Research Highlights

Coastal Sand Dunes

A major reason that people vacation or choose to live in coastal communities is the beauty that coastal sand dune environments provide. Aside from their visual splendor, coastal dunes offer a plethora of ecosystem services, such as natural barriers against storms and waves to protect residential and commercial investments. In this research, Dr, Schmutz and his students conducted surveys with local residents and tourists at Pensacola Beach to assess their knowledge of the ecosystem services that coastal dunes provide as well as their willingness to invest in the protection of these environments. Results indicated that both locals and tourists recognize the environmental and economic importance of coastal dunes, yet the different groups stated contrasting levels in their willingness to support dune management initiatives. Local residents indicated a substantially higher propensity to financially support dune management strategies compared to tourists.

Harris, E., P.P. Schmutz, C. Jackson, M. Anaya, M. Johnson, and G. Chapman. 2020. Beach User Perception on the Economic and Ecological Importance of Sand Dunes at Pensacola Beach, Florida. Southeastern Geographer, 60(4): 309–331. See the picture of the co-authors above. 


Department News

Three members of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences have been honored this semester by college or institution-wide awards. Dr. Kwame Owusu-Daaku received the UWF Faculty Excellence in Teaching or Advising Award. Ms. Chasidy Hobbs won the SGA Distinguished Teaching Award, for the second year in a row! Mr. Michael Hopko was recognized as the Outstanding Graduate Student of the Hal Marcus College of Science and Engineering. Congratulations to all three. The department is proud you have you in its ranks.